Archive for November, 2011

Is Bigger Better?

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

When shopping for a home, what’s on your wish-list? If you’re looking in the suburbs, due to the current state of the real estate market some of the giant homes are being sold for uber affordable prices. Does that mean you should swoop in and grab them? Not necessarily. If you’re looking in the city, the prices per square foot are still so high, that sometimes it’s important to ask yourself: is bigger really better? What could purchasing a small home save you? In time, money and headaches? A lot.

Here are somethings about small homes that make them extremely attractive:

1. Small homes cost less: not only upfront, but over the years. Heating and cooling a small house is so much less expensive than a big house. Furnishing and decorating all the extra rooms adds up, and renovating extra restrooms, or a giant kitchen, comes with a giant price tag. And don’t forget that you’ll be saving money on the property taxes because of the smaller square footage.

2. Tons of time saved: not having to clean 6 rooms, or 3600 square feet, will save you SO much time.

3. Easier to live simply: with less space, you have less stuff. Quick anecdote: when I moved into my first ever apartment in Boston, my dad was helping me move. My apartment was the typical tiny Beacon Hill unit, and I had a black bookshelf that didn’t fit into my room. I didn’t want to throw it away because it was perfectly good and almost brand new so my thought is that we would just put it in our living room. My dad warned my roommate and I against it saying, “Don’t. Give it away, if you put it out here, you’ll just find random stuff to fill it with.” We laughed and kept it. A year and a half later it was full of everything from old DVDs to owner’s manuals to an iron and we couldn’t seem to get rid of any of the stuff. I will never again own more than I need. Ok, so long story short… If you have extra space you will find a way to fill it, and that’s not a good thing.

4. Quality investments: when you have less space to fill, you can spend more money on quality pieces that will stand out in the limited space. You can also afford granite or marble slab for counters in a smaller kitchen, or nicer cabinets. You can update 2 bathrooms nicely and not have to worry about the downstairs ones… Basically, it takes less to make a smaller house really nice.

All in all, a small home also makes for a homier home. I think that if you’re attracted by the glitz and glam of the large McMansion, just take a moment to consider what a smaller home could save you. Is it worth it in the end?

(Source & inspiration)

Preparing Your Home For Winter

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

We’ve already has some cold days this year! Even though it has warmed back up a bit (I promise you that this is only temporary), I can assure you that winter is coming. However, it is not too late to take some steps to prep your home for the cold months ahead.

1. Give your boiler a check up

Whether you like it or not, your heat is going to get turned on soon (if it hasn’t been already). It’s a good idea to get your boiler tuned up. It could add years to its lifespan! If nothing else, the filter should be changed between cooling and heating, which is not a difficult task!

2. Inspect chimneys!

Now is the time! Do not wait to have them inspected or cleaned if you use your fire place regularly throughout the winter.

3. Weatherstripping

If you’re like me and live in an old building in Boston, you can actually feel the cold air blowing into your home from underneath doors and around windows. Get some floor snakes to go under your doors, and purchase some products to seal up your windows. Not only will you save money on heating, but you’ll be so much more comfortable when it starts getting really cold!

4. Prevent ice damns on your roof!

“Seal air leaks. Shutting down air leakage is probably going to have the biggest effect, and it’s the kind of thing you can do incrementally. The second would be adding insulation. If you have R18 insulation value, turn it into R36. This is where your energy audit will be helpful. And the third is making sure your roof is vented properly, if your house is designed to have a vented roof. Make sure your soffit vents aren’t blocked, your gable vents are open.” (Source)

5. Order a home energy audit

If you’ve been putting this off, now is the time to do it. They use an infrared gun to monitor heat leakage, and the process is so much more successful when it’s cold outside. The results could help you save money and stay warmer this winter!

6. Prepare an emergency kit

Collect a flashlight, batteries, matches, food and water in case of an emergency. Also, collect the phone numbers of your local utility companies and tape them somewhere safe!

Let us know if you have any other suggestions to keep everything and everyone safe this winter!

Source

Source